Published in Volume XXI, Issue 1, 2011, pages 73-106

Authors: L. Hartmann, N.D. Jones, J.G. Simonsen, S.B. Vrist

Abstract

Our goal is to provide a top-down approach to biomolecular computation. In spite of widespread discussion about connections between biology and computation, one question seems notable by its absence: Where are the programs? We identify a number of common features in programming that seem conspicuously absent from the literature on biomolecular computing; to partially redress this absence, we introduce a model of computation that is evidently programmable, by programs reminiscent of low-level computer machine code; and at the same time biologically plausible: its functioning is defined by a single and relatively small set of chemical-like reaction rules. Further properties: the model is stored-program: programs are the same as data, so programs are not only executable, but are also compilable and interpretable. It is universal: all computable functions can be computed (in natural ways and without arcane encodings of data and algorithm); it is also uniform: new “hardware” is not needed to solve new problems; and (last but not least) it is Turing complete in a strong sense: a universal algorithm exists, that is able to execute any program, and is not asymptotically inefficient.

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Bibtex

@article{sacscuza:hartmann2011pibcpsav,
  title={Programming in Biomolecular Computation: Programs, Self-Interpretation and Visualisation},
  author={L. Hartmann and N.D. Jones and J.G. Simonsen and S.B. Vrist},
  journal={Scientific Annals of Computer Science},
  volume={21},
  number={1},
  organization={``A.I. Cuza'' University, Iasi, Romania},
  year={2011},
  pages={73--106},
  publisher={``A.I. Cuza'' University Press}
}